Saturday, May 5, 2012

Columbus





If people ask what the campaign is about, tell them: "It's still about hope. It's still about change."



(transcript)

9 comments:

  1. I spent the last two days at my youngest daughter’s university graduation. The commencement speaker this weekend was Theodore Olson; past solicitor general. Ted is courageously carrying (and winning) the opposition to Cali’s Prop 8 against gay marriage, which will likely go to the Supreme Court. He has already argued 58 cases before the Supreme Court and won 75% of those. He carried a great message: listen to your foes because you may never be described more accurately. Learn from them; and always treat them with respect. Solid advice I have been seeking to implement.

    I like Olson. In my view, he understands that the relationship of marriage requires specific building blocks; starting with love. He tells the truth as he sees it. He doesn't carry water form you because you are a (D) or an (R).

    On to the video: I have spent lots of time with young adults over the last four years; I have met their parents on dad’s day and via other parent’s visits to campus. They have joined my family for extended time on 'breaks' or vacations from school (we live in sunny San Diego). I did the same for the three years before that with her older sister.

    I am an observer. In seven years I have never discussed politics with any of my girl’s classmates. But I listen closely. In the last 2 years, this is not a group that is vocally in favor of or excited about supporting Obama.

    The opening to this video made me uncomfortable for the President. This may be the first time I have seen him fail the eye test.

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  2. I don't know if your daughters' friends constitute a representative sample of young people or not. Polls show the president still overwhelmingly ahead in the 18-29 year old age group. The challenge is re-kindling the enthusiasm level, and making sure that they take the trouble to vote. Young people are not so good about turning out, and a lot of states are making it more difficult to register.

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  3. I agree ... just an observation over time. Young and old like rockstars, but that doesn't mean they would vote for them. No doubt, Obama is still a rockstar on campus.

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  4. << a lot of states are making it more difficult to register. >>

    Ha! Please, this is the i-Generation. They can find you when you don't want to be found because you use their generation's phone. They do things with technology our generation doesn't know exists. I think they can register.

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  5. It's not that they are incapable of registering. It is that it takes a little bit of time and trouble, and young people tend to be impatient, as well as being a bit apathetic. They also move around a lot. So for example, when you go off to another state for college you either have to ask for an absentee ballot in the state you came from, or you might have to get a new drivers' license in the state you moved to for school. And a lot of young people are just not going to bother.

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  6. And I should add that it might be because young people are technologically savvy, that they are going to be impatient with these old-fashioned requirements. They probably think you should be able to vote by using an app on your i-phone. And maybe you should be able to do that. But you can't.

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  7. << It's not that they are incapable of registering. It is that it takes a little bit of time and trouble, and young people tend to be impatient, as well as being a bit apathetic. >>

    Time and trouble? Only an apologist or progressive would say such a thing in a way that sounds sympathetic. I am also an impatient person. Especially with people who don't respect the vote. We are not talking about 13 year olds.

    One more time, so all you college students who are legal to vote have the opportunity: register lawfully (includes showing ID). Then, on election day, put your pants on, get your ID and go vote. If you can't do that then think ahead and get an absentee ballot.

    If that disenfranchises a college student who is accepting financial aid from states and the federal government, or taking out student loans, or both, or whose parents are so successful in the country they can dish out 25 to 55k a year for them to learn something, that is telling!

    << They probably think you should be able to vote by using an app on your i-phone.>>

    You really do underestimate this generation. That's the kind of patronizing comment that 21 year old students at university would scold you for saying.

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  8. It's not a question of sympathy or apologizing for young people. I'm just stating facts. Young people are notorious for their low turnout. It's irresponsible. It's lazy. It's ignorant. It's whatever you want to call it. But it's a fact. There was one presidential election (only one) that I didn't vote in myself when I was a younger person and had moved to a new state and new address and didn't get around to registering. I make no excuse for that. It's just a fact. So I'm for making it easier for people to vote. Because it is the people's Constitutional right, in fact their most important Constitutional right, and it should be much easier for people to exercise their right regardless of whether they are lazy or irresponsible or ignorant. (For example, why do we vote on Tuesday, when people have to work? Why don't we vote over the weekend the way they do in a lot of countries? Why don't we have a holiday on election day?)

    In a number of states there is a concerted effort going on to make it more difficult for people to vote. And the reason for that is because the people sponsoring those laws know very well that young people tend to vote more Democratic these days. If you want to say that the reason for those laws is to prevent voter fraud, I'm not going to argue with you about that again. I will just think you are delusional, and reserve the right to delete any more comments on that topic.

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  9. << For example, why do we vote on Tuesday, when people have to work? Why don't we vote over the weekend the way they do in a lot of countries? Why don't we have a holiday on election day? >>

    I completely agree.

    On voting: my point was that if you can spend months and countless hours getting student loans you can figure out how to vote. Let me know if you can match my personal experience with two college students over the last seven years. Perhaps you have insight I don't have?

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